Legal Highs to be banned immediately in New Zealand

All legal highs including synthetic cannabis are to be removed and banned from shelves in the next two weeks according to Legal Highs NZ – Peter Dunne made the announcement last minute because Labour Leader David Cunliffe had planned to make an announcement in the following 24 hours that Labour were going to introduce their own policy to remove legal highs from shelves. Many experts are concerned that this will simply drive users to seek the substances from organized crime syndicates. It is possible for users to purchase the pure cannabinoid ingredients online and manufacturer their own synthetic cannabis or simply use the pure chemicals without “watering it down” on a leaf base. There are concerns that addicts will turn to using these pure chemicals in glass pipes similar to the way methamphetamine addicts smoke pure crystal. Ross Bell from the NZ Drug Foundation told media last week that customs are going to have a very hard time stopping drug users from buying synthetic cannabinoids online as the amount needed for up to 500 doses was less than a 1/4 …

Side Effects from Synthetic Cannabis

Synthetic Cannabis use, just like any drug, including alcohol can cause a number of side effects, some of which can be more serious the more you use. Just like alcohol there are common side effects from using synthetic cannabis, but more serious side effects can occur when a user abuses these products. Some side effects from drugs and alcohol are quite similar, however where alcohol may cause a user to have reduced anxiety, some synthetic cannabis drugs may induce mild anxiety in heavy or first time users. For the full list of synthetic cannabis side effects please follow this link; http://www.legalhighs.co.nz/synthetic-cannabis/synthetic-cannabis-side-effects-know-when-to-stop-abusing-legal-highs/2014

The drug revolution that no one can stop

In 2009 The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction’s early warning system identified 24 new drugs. In 2010, it identified 41. In 2011, another 49, and in 2012, there were 73 more. By October 2013, a further 56 new compounds had already been identified—a total of 243 new compounds in just four years. In its latest World Drug Report, the United Nations acknowledged this extraordinary expansion: “While new harmful substances have been emerging with unfailing regularity on the drug scene,” it said, “the international drug control system is floundering, for the first time, under the speed and creativity of the phenomenon.” Technology and drugs have always existed in an easy symbiosis: the first thing ever bought and sold across the Internet was a bag of marijuana. In 1971 or 1972, students at Stanford University’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory used ARPANET—the earliest iteration of the Internet—to arrange a marijuana deal with their counterparts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Read the FULL brilliant report here https://medium.com/matter/19f753fb15e0