Addiction Research – A Battle to Win

I wanted to talk about addiction. I have a background in psychology. I am actually quitting smoking tomorrow, and cutting down today. I’ve been around the drug scene. Some of my friends are in various health services as well. So, it’s not just dry science to me. Old school mentalities toward addiction include the likes of the disease model. Basically that’s like being branded in a way. You’re stuck with it. But there are many other models of recovery and addiction itself. Rational Recovery for example pits the higher mind against the animal brain – in a manner perhaps comparable to cognitive behavioural therapy. Which leads me nicely along to the piece of research I’d like to talk about. [i] Coked up Marsupials Basically they got some cocaine addicted rats. Rats that would endure pain to get cocaine. Okay, so they aren’t in PETA. They targeted an area of the brain associated in humans with inhibition and decision making. By targeting this region, in the addicted rats, they reduced compulsive drug taking behaviour. Pretty cool, right? The region targeted in …

Kratom Tea Is the Beverage of Recovering Heroin Addicts

Someone told me about a place in Wilmington, North Carolina, that sells tea brewed from “some weird drug called kratom that’s illegal in Thailand.” The place—a tiki bar called Kat 5 Kava that doesn’t serve alcohol—is like some sort of toned-down methadone clinic or legal opium den, I heard. I was intrigued. Even though it’s been around for some time, the media is calling kratom a “new legal drug.” A tree native to Thailand, kratom leaves are harvested and dried to create the drug, which was banned there in 1943, after people had started to use it as an opium alternative and the government realized it wasn’t being taxed. Last week, I was out drinking at a bar down the street from Kat 5 Kava, so I stopped in to try a cup of kratom tea. Inside the establishment, a group of people sat sluggishly at a table near a bar that was surrounded by multiple screens playing nature videos of whales swimming in the ocean and deer frolicking in the woods. I looked at the menu on the wall. Half of it …

Side Effects from Synthetic Cannabis

Synthetic Cannabis use, just like any drug, including alcohol can cause a number of side effects, some of which can be more serious the more you use. Just like alcohol there are common side effects from using synthetic cannabis, but more serious side effects can occur when a user abuses these products. Some side effects from drugs and alcohol are quite similar, however where alcohol may cause a user to have reduced anxiety, some synthetic cannabis drugs may induce mild anxiety in heavy or first time users. For the full list of synthetic cannabis side effects please follow this link; http://www.legalhighs.co.nz/synthetic-cannabis/synthetic-cannabis-side-effects-know-when-to-stop-abusing-legal-highs/2014

An addiction I didn’t know I had

Five weeks ago today I arranged to meet a workmate and our supervisor at a handy BP Connect for a coffee and strategy session. While waiting for the ‘boss’ to arrive my mate apologized if over the previous two weeks he had offended me in any way. He went on to say that after speaking to a heart specialist over an irregular heartbeat he had developed recently he had given up drinking caffeine. For the last two weeks he had been, in his own words, “grumpy and tired”. Keep reading http://xmusicmanx.blogspot.co.nz/2014/02/an-addiction-i-didnt-know-i-had.html

How A Big Drug Company Inadvertently Got Americans Hooked On Heroin

When she was 18, Arielle would come home every day and embark on what she calls an “Easter egg hunt.” She wasn’t looking for candy. Arielle was hunting behind stairwells and inside closets in her suburban Long Island home for the OxyContin bottles her cousin brought home from work at a pharmacy and was hiding from her mother around the house. “I found them one day, and I wanted to try them because all of my friends were already hooked,” said Arielle, who asked that her last name be withheld to avoid hurting her chances of getting a job. “I would see [my cousin] nodding out on the couch and not really being present, and that was how I wanted to feel. My best friend had just passed away, so I was numbing out the feelings.” It took about a year before Arielle moved from prescription painkillers into the illegal drug that killed her best friend: heroin. She snorted it for the first time after tagging along with a friend who was going to buy some. “I was like, ‘I …