Natures Highs: Part 3 – Opening the Third Eye

There are in fact loads of psychedelics in nature. Unfortunately, some of these plants are illegal to own, and some illegal to process. So in this week’s addition about psychedelic plant drugs in New Zealand, I’ll be dividing the plants up into “Legal to own, but not process” and “Legal in general”. It’s important to note that some plants like San Pedro are common, legal to possess but processing them, such as making a tea from one, or extracting the Mescaline, as Mescaline is a Class A drug, is a felony – so please I advise you not to do this. Remember also, that if you wish to explore the self, meditation, floatation and hypnosis are effective routes! Fully Legit The plants that are fully legal are often pretty mild in effect, but effective all the same. On the less LSD like side, we have ‘Sun Opener’ which I have not personally tried, but it apparently produces a cannabis like psychedelia and colored vision. It’s well enough rated by others to be worthy of a mention, certainly not euphoric like cannabis, …

Scientists have studied exactly what Psychedelics do to the brain, and it’s not what we’ve been told

It turns out that psychedelics aren’t just good for turning into an elf and jousting a car. Psychiatrists, psychologists and specialists in addiction and recovery from traumatic experiences have been investigating the use of hallucinogens in treatment programs, and the results indicate that psychedelics actually have practical therapeutic uses. And one drug has proven particularly useful. Repeated studies have found the psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms, psilocybin, can help people move past major life issues — like beating alcoholism and becoming more empathetic. The research: One study concluded that controlled exposure to psilocybin could have long-lasting medical and spiritual benefits. In 2011, Johns Hopkins researchers found that by giving volunteer test subjects just the right dose (not enough to give them a terrifying bad trip), they were able to reliably induce transcendental experiences in volunteers. This provoked long-lasting psychological growth and helped the volunteers to find peace in their lives, all without side effects. Nearly all of the 18 test subjects, average age 46, were college graduates. Seventy-eight percent were religious and all were interested in finding a scientific experience. Fourteen months later, …

Is Ayahuasca a legitimate Spiritual Path?

How do “mindful” Western, spiritual folk relate to a magic tea from the Amazon that can cure illness and accelerate burning through your karma? The medicine is ayahuasca, a traditional South American tea brewed up of two different plants then ingested for shamanic, healing, and spiritual purposes. It ain’t for fun, nor is it a way to avoid your issues or psychology. Far from it. However, some spiritual circles and communities might frown upon its use, arguing it’s trying to take an easy way out.  The lack of education around ayahuasca has people thinking it’s simply another hallucinogenic, new age, feel good, hipsterific experience. From my own experience, it’s work—plain and simple. And, used in conjunction with your meditation, yoga, or other mindfulness-based practice, ayahuasca can change your life for the better. When used properly and under the guidance of trained shamans, the experience is extraordinary and deeply healing. People say that one strong medicine ceremony is akin to years of therapy. Continue reading: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/01/is-ayahuasca-a-legitimate-spiritual-path/

Further Proof Psychedelic Mushrooms Can Help Keep You Sane

Anxiety disorders top the list of America’s mental illnesses, affecting 18 percent of the U.S. population. Yet, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, only a third of its sufferers receive treatment for it. Meanwhile, the association reports that 3 to 5 percent of the population is dealing with depression at any given time—and nearly half of these people are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. According to a new study, the solution could come to some in the form of “magic” mushrooms. The study, published recently in the journal Biological Psychiatry, adds to the growing pile of research that suggests psilocybin—the bioactive ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms—may have positive effects on mental health. Researchers at the Psychiatric University Hospital of Zurich looked at psilocybin’s impact on the amygdala, which plays a central role in the brain’s limbic system by processing anxiety, fear and other negative emotions. Depression and anxiety disorders can result from an imbalance here: “When emotions are unable to be processed correctly, it can trigger mental disorders. When the amygdala responds to stimuli with intense activity, …