Video source missing

What’s In My Baggie? – Full Documentary about misrepresented substances

Neo Cannabis, Documentary, Drugs, Knowledge, Legal Highs, Psychoactive Substances, Video

“What’s In My Baggie?” is a documentary on the rise of misrepresented substances, as well as a critique of ineffective drug policy. According to the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, over 250 new drugs have been discovered since 2009. There are so many different psychoactive drugs floating around that people don’t even realize the complex nature of the current situation. To document our findings, we filmed substance test kit results at music festivals, as well as interviews with harm reduction organizations, law enforcement officials, and distributors of these illicit substances. We quickly discovered that most of the time people were surprised to find that their bag of drugs was not what they paid for. For more info, visit whatsinmybaggie.com  

Video source missing

Dirty Pictures – Alexander ‘Sasha’ Shulgin – The scientist behind more than 200 psychedelic compounds including MDMA

Neo Documentary, Knowledge, Legal Highs, Life, Psychedelics, Psychoactive Substances, Research, Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5q1bBVzDpc Alexander ‘Sasha’ Shulgin is the scientist behind more than 200 psychedelic compounds including MDMA, more commonly known as Esctasy. Considered to be one of the the greatest chemists of the twentieth century, Sasha’s vast array of discoveries have had a profound impact in the field of psychedelic research. ‘Dirty Pictures’ delves into the lifework of Dr. Shulgin and scientists alike, explores the world of these scientists; their findings and motivations, their ideas, and their beliefs as to how research in this particular field can aid in unlocking the complexities of the mind.

The drug revolution that no one can stop

Neo Drugs, Knowledge, Legal Highs, Psychoactive Substances

In 2009 The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction’s early warning system identified 24 new drugs. In 2010, it identified 41. In 2011, another 49, and in 2012, there were 73 more. By October 2013, a further 56 new compounds had already been identified—a total of 243 new compounds in just four years. In its latest World Drug Report, the United Nations acknowledged this extraordinary expansion: “While new harmful substances have been emerging with unfailing regularity on the drug scene,” it said, “the international drug control system is floundering, for the first time, under the speed and creativity of the phenomenon.” Technology and drugs have always existed in an easy symbiosis: the first thing ever bought and sold across the Internet was a bag of marijuana. In 1971 or 1972, students at Stanford University’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory used ARPANET—the earliest iteration of the Internet—to arrange a marijuana deal with their counterparts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Read the FULL brilliant report here https://medium.com/matter/19f753fb15e0

A pioneering act which scientifically regulates legal highs rather than banning them has attracted global drug reformers to New Zealand.

Neo Drugs, Legal Highs, News

The reformers meet in Auckland this month to discuss the Psychoactive Substances Act and advocate further drug reform. The act offers a world-first scientific and health-oriented approach to legal highs. The British Government was reportedly looking to New Zealand as a positive model. Speaker Rick Doblin, a long-time drug advocate and founder of the US-based Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, said it was a basic right that people be able to access their own states of consciousness. ”While these are substances which people use for recreation, they also use them for spirituality,” he said. I hope we learn in the United States that we should focus on reduction of harm and purity of drugs.” Many were looking to New Zealand as a pioneer after the enactment of the act last year, Star Trust general manager Grant Hall said. A key part of the new legislation has been the ability to remove products from the market that cause harm. Five have already been removed. Before the act came into force about 200 legal high products were sold from 4000 outlets throughout …